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If you’ve never squirted, you might think it’s one of those things where some bodies just can do it, and others just can’t. But the vast majority of vagina-owners are probably capable of squirting.

Squirting describes when a person with a clitoris releases a specific type of ejaculate in response to some kind of sexual stimulation, usually around their G-spot. It can come with intense pleasure and can sometimes coincide with an orgasm. A popular misconception is that this fluid is pee—but that’s not exactly accurate. It does have some similar components as urine (which itself is mostly water, BTW), but the liquid released with squirting is usually clear and odorless and contains some of the same chemical properties as semen. 

Unfortunately, research on this particular sexual response is frustratingly scarce. One 1984 study on 227 women found 54 percent had experienced “an orgasmic expulsion of fluid” at least once, while more recent studies estimate it’s anywhere between 10 to 54 percent of women. That said, many sex educators — including sex researcher and NYU sexuality professor Dr. Zhana Vrangalova — believe virtually every person with a vagina can learn how to squirt. That’s because the gushing, geyser-like response most people associate with squirting is believed to come from the bladder and out the urethra. 

“Literally every single vagina-owner has this anatomical structure,” Dr. Vrangalova explains to O.school. “So the question is just, can you reach it in the right way at the right time under the right psychological circumstances?”

Here’s the most reliable way to do it:

Steps for making someone or yourself squirt.

1. Make sure you’re in the mood for sex involving squirting. 

The buildup to squirting often involves applying a lot of pressure to the upper internal wall of the vagina using repetitive, fast motions with whatever’s doing the penetrating (your fingers, a partner’s fingers, a toy, etc.). It’s a pretty high-energy process, which can be totally sexy sometimes and not appealing at all at other times. Try it when you (and your partner, if applicable) are game for something a little exciting and perhaps a little intense.

2. Pee beforehand. 

When you’re about to squirt, it often feels like you’re about to pee — something many people worry about and try to hold it in. This can subvert any efforts to squirt. If you pee beforehand, you’ll feel more comfortable just letting go because you know you’ve already emptied out your urine earlier.

3. Get aroused. 

Stimulate the external clit, which is that small-ish nub around where the outer labia meet at the top of the vulva. Touch it the way you would for an orgasm or anything else you normally do to get yourself turned on. Don’t skip this step — vagina-owners’ genitals fill up with blood and become engorged when aroused (just like penises!), Dr. Vrangalova says, and that will make it easier to apply pressure to the urethra via the G-spot.

4. Find the G-spot. 

The G-spot is essentially where the internal clitoris and vagina intersect, which is why it feels so good for many vagina owners when stimulated. The urethra also passes through this intersection, and putting pressure on it is one of the easiest ways to make a person squirt. “The G-spot is on the belly-button side of the vagina, typically a few inches in,” says Kait Scalisi, MPH, an O.school Pleasure Pro, certified sex educator, and founder of Passion by Kait. “For some vagina owners, it feels different than the rest of the vagina: more like the roof of your mouth versus the inside of your cheek.” 

5. Use up-and-down motions to stimulate the G-spot. 

Use two fingers about two knuckles in or a firm, curved toy to stimulate the G-spot. (The NJoy Pure Wand is a bit of a cult favorite for G-spot stimulation, though anything with that sort of curve can work great.) You can “tap, massage, make a ‘come-hither’ signal, or stroke,” Scalisi recommends. In general, you should be more pressing up and down on that spot, rather than going in and out of the vagina.

6. Build up the pressure. 

Whichever of those above techniques is feeling good for you—build it up! The harder you press against the urethra, the easier it’ll be for it to expel that liquid from the bladder. Go for a repetitive motion with increasing speed and pressure. Scalisi says it might need to be as much pressure as a “good shoulder massage.”

7. Lean into the feeling of needing to pee — it’s a good sign! 

Don’t hold it in. Just relax into it and let it go. You might even try bearing down the way you would when you’re peeing.

8. Listen to bodily cues. 

Although the aforementioned method is widely considered the most reliable way to make someone squirt, it’s certainly not the only way. Dr. Vrangalova’s research on squirting has found people can experience it from all different kinds of stimulation — some people find penetration actually makes it harder and require external clitoral stimulation alone, for example, and others might need a combination of clitoral and anal stimulation. If the G-spot-centric method isn’t working for you, explore and see what works.

Is squirting real?

Totally. Plenty of studies have documented experiences with squirting. Some researchers have literally brought volunteers into labs and gotten them to squirt right in front of them.

That said, there’s still a lot of debate over what squirting is exactly. A few things we do know: 

  • Vagina-owners produce two different kinds of ejaculate: One is a diluted fluid from the bladder that shares a lot of the same properties as urine, except it’s clear as water, colorless, and often odorless. This kind is most accurately called squirting, as it usually comes out gushing in large quantities.
  • The second kind of ejaculate is white and milky and shares a lot of chemical similarities to semen. That stuff often referred to as “female ejaculation,” is believed to come from the Skene’s glands, a set of glands embedded in some vagina owners’ urethra walls and sometimes called the “female prostate.” The Skene’s glands can drain out this fluid during sex from its own ducts just below the urethra opening or from the urethra itself, sometimes mixed in with the squirting fluid from the bladder, Dr. Vrangalova explains.
  • Squirting doesn’t always coincide with an orgasm. Some people squirt without having an orgasm; some can have them at the same time.
  • Though some people don’t find the squirting sensation to be particularly pleasurable, research finds most women and their partners feel their squirting experiences have enriched their sexual lives. (“It was honestly the most amazing thing I think I've ever felt. My body was shaking, my head was spinning, and about three seconds into my orgasm I squirted,” one woman shared on Reddit. “It felt incredible and different from any orgasm I've ever experienced.”)

Even if squirting may be possible for all vagina owners, it’s not always the easiest task for some people. It can be a fun extra addition to the pleasure menu, but it’s not really something to get fixated on if it’s not coming easily for you. Dr. Vrangalova emphasizes: “Plenty of people have extremely satisfying sex lives with amazing orgasms or endless multiple orgasms without ever squirting, and they seem to be doing just fine.”

Related Articles:

Is Squirting Real?

Top 5 G-Spot Sex Positions 

What Is a G-Spot?

All Things Squirting

References

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