Should I Pee After Masturbating?

Do I *need* to pee after masturbating? It depends.

Should I Pee After Masturbating?

Should I Pee After Masturbating?

Should I Pee After Masturbating?

Published
January 9, 2020
— Updated
June 2, 2021
Medically Reviewed by
5 minute read

You’ve likely heard that peeing after sex can prevent a urinary tract infection (UTI). If you deal with frequent UTIs, you probably follow this advice. But what about urinating after masturbation

What is a UTI? 

A UTI is the result of bacteria in the urinary tract. The lower urinary tract is made up of the bladder and the urethra (the tube that carries urine out of the body); the upper urinary tract includes the kidneys and the ureters (the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder). Most UTIs affect the bladder. In some cases, however, UTIs may travel to the upper urinary tract and cause a kidney infection, which can lead to serious illness and should be treated right away (1). 

UTI symptoms include:

  • A persistent urge to urinate 
  • Urine with a strong odor 
  • Burning during urination
  • Cloudy or bloody urine
  • Pelvic pain 
  • Fever

If you think you have a UTI, see a healthcare provider as soon as possible. The first line of treatment is often prescribed antibiotics. 

Who is at risk of getting a UTI?

While people with penises can get UTIs, they are more common in people with vulvas, whose urethras are shorter and closer to the anus, allowing bacteria to enter the urinary tract more easily. Lower estrogen levels among people who’ve gone through menopause, anatomical differences like a shorter than average urethra, and health conditions like diabetes or kidney stones can all lead to more frequent UTIs (1).

Why pee after masturbating? 

During sexual activity, including masturbation, bacteria can easily be transferred from the skin on or around the anus to the opening of the urethra, which can cause a urinary tract infection. Peeing can help to flush this bacteria out of the urethra (2).

Who should pee after masturbating? 

For people with vulvas, it’s a good idea to pee before and after any sort of sexual activity, including masturbation, since urinating can help to cleanse the urethra and get rid of bacteria. In general, people with penises don’t really need to pee after masturbating, since they tend to be at much lower risk for UTIs. If you have a penis and cope with frequent UTIs, however, peeing after masturbation can help remove bacteria from the urethra and prevent additional infections. (Not sure if this is you? Ask your healthcare provider.) 

Does peeing after masturbation prevent UTIs? 

Peeing after masturbation and other sexual activities can be helpful in preventing UTIs, but will not prevent them one hundred percent of the time (3). If you think you have a UTI, or cope with frequent UTIs, consult a healthcare provider. 

Is there a reason why I shouldn’t pee after masturbating? 

No. Ultimately, there is no harm in peeing after masturbation. It can only help cleanse your urethra to prevent a UTI. 

Other precautions to take during masturbation: 

Peeing after masturbation isn’t the only precaution you should consider taking. Thoroughly washing your hands before and after masturbating, keeping fingernails trimmed, cleaning toys used during masturbation, and using lube for masturbation involving penetration are all good ways to minimize the risk of bacterial infection (4).

If you use the same toys for different body openings, or if you share them with others, it’s important to thoroughly clean your toys, or use condoms: Change condoms or clean your toys before you switch between partners or between the vagina, anus, and mouth. This can help to reduce the risk of STI transmission and the transfer of bacteria (5). 

What if I think I have a UTI? 

If you experience discomfort during or after masturbation, or are having symptoms of a UTI, talk to a healthcare provider: They can help you figure out what’s going on and what kind of treatment might be necessary.

Reviewed for Medical Accuracy

When Anna isn't trying to create a groundbreaking third-person bio for herself, she's working as a freelance writer, editor, and content strategist. She was previously the deputy editor at So Yummy and lifestyle editor at HelloGiggles, and has worked with publications such as Teen Vogue, Nylon, InStyle, Glamour, Bust, Catapult, and more.

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References

1. “Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs).” FAQs. American College of Gynecologists and Obstetricians. Reviewed November 2020. https://www.acog.org/womens-health/faqs/urinary-tract-infections

2. Chung, Amanda, Mohan Arianayagam and Prem Rashid. 2010. “Bacterial cystitis in women.” Australian Family Physician 39, no. 5 (May): 296-298 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Mohan-Arianayagam/publication/44614433_Bacterial_cystitis_in_women/links/0c960517f54b1f4028000000/Bacterial-cystitis-in-women.pdf

3. Beisel, Bert, Wayne A. Hale, Rebecca S. Graves. 2002. “Does postcoital voiding prevent urinary tract infections in young women?” Journal of Family Practice 51, no. 11 (November): 977

4. “How Do I Treat and Prevent UTIs?” Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Accessed May 24, 2021. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/health-and-wellness/urinary-tract-infections-utis/how-do-i-treat-and-prevent-utis

5. “Masturbation.” Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Accessed May 24, 2021. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/sex-pleasure-and-sexual-dysfunction/masturbation